Congratulation to the holiday

Lag B'Omer

from 18-05-2022

Lag B'Omer is a holiday celebrated on the 33rd day of the Counting of the Omer. The Omer is a specific interval of time between two other Jewish holidays – Pesach and Shavuot. The counting of the omer begins on the day after Pesach, when a sheaf of barley was sacrificed to the Temple in Jerusalem and ends the day before Shavuot, when a sheaf of wheat was brought to the Temple. The Omer lasts for seven weeks. This year, Lag B'omer falls on May 18th.
The tradition of celebrating Lag B'Omer dates back to the Middle Ages, to the era of the spread of the mystical teachings of Kabbalah. The Bible does not mention this holiday. During this period, many laws were in force, reminiscent of the laws of Jewish mourning. The Talmudic tradition associated this with historical events: under the anti-Roman revolt of Bar Kokhba in the middle of the II century AD many Jews suffered from the plague, which hit the rebels during the Omer period. On the 33rd day of the Omer, the plague stopped, so all mourning restrictions were traditionally lifted on Lag B'Omer. Many weddings were held on this day, classes in heders and yeshivas were canceled, and children went to the forests with their teachers to shoot homemade bows, playing out the battles between the Romans and the Jewish rebels. In Israel, this day is still associated with picnics, barbecues, and field trips, where children bake potatoes in the ashes of a fire.

Congratulation to the holiday

Lag B'Omer

from 18-05-2022

The holiday has a rather intricate history associated with the names of many interesting personalities – Rabbi Akiva, Shimon bar Yochai and, of course, Bar Kochba.
In Jewish sources, the rebel and national leader Shimon, nicknamed Bar-Kokhba (“son of the star”), is described ambiguously. Rabbi Akiva considered him the Messiah, who came to liberate the land of Israel from Roman rule, other sages reproached Bar-Kokhba for excessive cruelty and blamed Rabbi Akiva for hasty conclusions. According to the sources, Bar Kokhba did not come from a noble family and was not rich, but he possessed extraordinary physical strength. He managed to unite enough rebels around himself to force the Roman authorities to transfer armed legions from other provinces to the Land of Israel. The immediate cause of the uprising is thought to be the Roman decree of 129: a plan to build a pagan city with a temple to Jupiter on the site of Jerusalem. It is not known whether Bar Kochba's army succeeded in occupying Jerusalem, but on the rebels' territory and in their military camps a certain emphasis was made upon observing the Jewish commandments, such as keeping the Sabbath and Shmita years.
The uprising lasted for about three and a half years, but the followers of Bar Kochba could not compete with the arriving Roman legions. The last stronghold of the rebels was the Beitar fortress in the Judean mountains. As a result of the Roman retaliatory operation, not only it but also several hundred Jewish settlements were razed to the ground. However, the Roman side also suffered heavy losses. Therefore, on the holiday of Lag B'Omer, it is customary to remember the heroism of the Jewish rebels.

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